Cactus. Art Gallery Fashion Design. Minimal
Written by Craig B

How Much Does Cactus Removal Cost?

HOW MUCH DOES CACTUS REMOVAL COST?

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The average cactus removal cost is $1,400 with the average cactus removal cost ranging from $300 to $2,500 in 2021. Your estimated cactus removal cost will depend on the size of the cactus, it’s accessibility, and what is surrounding it. These aren’t actual cactus removal costs. To get a real estimate we’ll have to send out one of our professionals to visit your property, assess the cactus, and provide you a genuine estimate.

UNDERSTANDING CACTUS REMOVAL COSTS

Find out more about your cactus removal costs by giving us a call today! The bigger the cactus will increase the cost of removal. Saguaro cactus removal costs can be the most expensive because of their large size. Additionally, costs depend on the number of arms the cactus has as well. We can schedule a visit at your property so we can do an assessment on the cactus and provide you with a better quote on the cost for its removal.

Cactus come in every shape and size but share one thing: they are dangerous and hard to remove. Our Phoenix-area cactus removal professionals utilize specialized tools and skillfully trained employees to correctly remove the cactus on your property. It doesn’t matter if it’s a tall, slanted Saguaro or a patch of prickly pear cacti, we can remove them. We have been providing cactus removal service in Phoenix for over twenty years, and our experience shows it. You can trust our cactus removal professionals.

NO PRESSURE!

Our Phoenix cactus removal professionals will not try and sell you a cactus service you don’t need. Because of honest professionals in the cactus industry, we will tell you right away whether our assessment is good or bad as to whether your cactus can survive being trimmed or removed.

HIRE PROFESSIONALS TO REMOVE YOUR CACTUS

When you are shopping around to have your cactus removed without jeopardizing you or your family’s safety, give us a call! Want to keep clear from hazardous cactus thorns covered with the disease that is the cause of Bacterial Necrosis? Yes. Do you want to attempt to remove your Saguaro cactus by yourself? No. A cactus thorns ruin shoes, carpets and home, and can be harmful to children and pets; have our professionals remove the cactus giving you problems. And don’t forget, our estimates are free!

We are more than happy to provide you a free estimate. In some cases, we are able to offer same day estimates and are priced highly competitively.

TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL SERVICES PHOENIX

If you own a property in the Phoenix Valley our team of trained, licensed, and insured tree cutting professionals will cut down and remove your tree safely and affordable. Every one of our skilled technicians understands our safe tree removal and cutting protocols and work together to get the job done quickly and safely. Keeping your property in the best condition possible while removing the tree is also our top priority. We remove the tree, clean up the mess, and leave your property in great condition.

How-To-Water-A-Cactus
Written by webtechs

How To Water A Cactus

HOW TO WATER A CACTUS

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If you’re searching for how to water a cactus, this guide will help you care for your prickly friend. Did you know, your outdoor cacti require watering too? Below is how you should do just that. If you don’t care for your cacti property they will get sick, die, and need cactus removal. Learn how to water a cactus at your home or business.

HOW TO WATER A CACTUS

One of the most common questions we’re asked as a nursery is, how to water a cactus. Although each situation varies a little, so if you’re already watering your cacti and it is working, ignore these recommendations. These are just the things we have had success with, your situation may be different.

WATER SLOW AND DEEP

When cacti are in the ground, this technique appears to maintain their stress levels to allow for a more even growth. This technique is often known as ‘deep soaking’. A deep soak is steady and slow, dripping from a garden hose. This is often done between two and six hours. The duration is based on the plant size.

WATER IN POTS

When it comes to cacti growing in pots, we water them twice. First, several pots are watered at once in four-foot sections. We water enough to fill pots. Then, we go back water a second time to ensure a deep and even watering for the soil.

REMEMBER, DAILY TEMPS ARE A FACTOR

When you are watering cacti in a warmer climate, you will need to water more often. Whereas, cooler climates do not require water as often or apply as much. For more information on best amounts to water based on your temperatures, check out the Seasonal Watering Tips below.

SIZE OF PLANT COUNTS

This is another factor, as cacti that is bigger and more established will not require watering as often. This is because the bigger a cactus is, the bigger its storage tank is, which is where the cacti store water until needed (think of a camel’s hump). The bigger this tank, the longer it can go between watering. For instance, larger Saguaro may be fine without watering while a smaller 1-gallon Gold Barrel may require a weekly watering.

DON’T WATER NEWLY PLANTED CACTUS

Adding or repotting your landscape? You should plant them dry and wait on watering. When to water is based on temperatures, the cooler your climate is, the longer you should wait to water. Generally, waiting at least a week is recommended to provide succulent roots enough time for healing prior to exposing them to water. Future watering should only be done when soil has become dry at the roots, but each situation will be different.

HOW OFTEN TO WATER A CACTUS

How often you should water you cactus depends on the season, temperatures, and how long your cactus has been growing. Read below for guidelines on how often you should water your cactus.

SEASONAL WATERING

SUMMER – During this time temperatures reach over 90° for several days at a time. Deep soak is the technique we prefer, giving a slow and steady drip from a hose over several hours, depending on the plant size.

NEWLY PLANTED CACTI – Except for Saguaros, when temperatures during the day reach above 90°, do not water before one week of planting. However, if temperatures are UNDER 90°, do not water before two weeks of planting date.

EXCEPTIONS

There are some exceptions to these recommendations. Agaves need to be watered right after planting if temperatures are above 90°. Although, temperatures under 90° should wait to water. Saguaros should not be watered in most cases, ever. Unless you’re currently experiencing a drought period, and you notice the cacti has started shrinking and it’s very dry. Of course, this does not mean simply start hosing down the plant when the feeling occurs, it should be for good reason. Common sense has become an uncommon commodity, so we don’t use the term ‘Common Sense’. The neighbor is not where you should get information regarding landscape plants. If you are advised specific patterns by nurserymen, you should follow them. The neighbor from New Jersey probably isn’t the source to go by!

NEWLY PLANTED CACTUS WATERING

If you’ve just planted your cactus the watering schedule for the summers and winters will be a little different than those that are already well established. Keep in mind that newly planted cactus are more sensitive to higher and lower temperatures.

FIRST SUMMER

Except for Saguaros, both non-native and native cacti should have a deep soaking done at two-week intervals when temperatures are ABOVE 90°. When heat is extreme, Agaves might require watering weekly, but this tends to be too frequent. When in pots, cacti should be in full sun and need to be checked for moisture frequently because roots will be exposed to extreme heat daily. To check for moisture, simply push a wooden paint stick or unfinished dowel in the soil to the bottom. Leave it in for 15 to 20 minutes, then check it for moisture. The reason for it to be unfinished, is to allow it to soak up moisture. This will teach you the pattern needed for watering your cacti.

FIRST WINTER

Except for Saguaros, when temperatures drop UNDER 90°° during the day, non-native and native cacti should both receive a monthly deep soak. However, this should only be done if rainfall is under 1-inch per month. If your area is receiving over 1-inch of rain per month, do not water the cacti.

SECOND SUMMER

Except for Saguaros, when temperatures are ABOVE 90° during the day, native cacti need a monthly deep soak. However, non-native cacti need two deep soaks per month.

SECOND WINTER

Except for Saguaros, you should never water native cacti, even with rainfall absence during the winter. However, a non-native cactus should receive a monthly deep soak.

THIRD SUMMER AND THERE AFTER

With the exception of Saguaros, a native cactus should not require additional watering and should be naturalized at this point. Non-native cacti at this point, should be naturalized and not require watering. However, during periods of extreme heat and not rainfall, a monthly deep soak is suggested.

CACTUS CARE & REMOVAL SERVICES

If you need some help keeping a cactus healthy or a cactus on your property needs to be removed, Phoenix Trim-A-Tree can help! Our team can help ensure that your cacti are getting the right soil nutrients and can remove dead or damaged cacti from your landscape. We are licensed and insured to provide all of our customers peace of mind no matter how big a job is. Call today for more information about or cactus care and removal services at 480-962-0701.

Save-A-Dying-Cactus-How-To
Written by webtechs

Save A Dying Cactus: How To Revive Your Plant

SAVE A DYING CACTUS: HOW TO REVIVE YOUR PLANT

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If you are searching for How To Save a Dying Cactus, this article should help. Most people who buy and tend cacti love them. When they get sick it’s upsetting as they’ve likely been around for years. Use these steps to help save a dying cactus at your home or business.

CUT ROTTING PARTS AWAY

Rotting is generally a sign of overwatering. The black or brown sections of the cactus must be cut away. Then you must decide if your soil is completely soaked and should be put in a new pot with new soil, or if you’ll be able to let it dry out and begin your new watering schedule again. If you decide to repot your cactus you should use mix one part peat, two parts garden soil, and two parts coarse sand.

ADJUST DAILY SUNLIGHT

Depending on the sunlight available your cactus may be getting too much or not enough sunlight. For cactus which are becoming more narrow or rounded more sunlight should be added. Either place the plant where it gets more hours of sunlight a day or choose to move it in the midday for best results.

ADJUST WATERING

For cacti that look wilted, are shrinking, or are wrinkled you should add water. It’s important to allow the soil to completely dry before watering, to avoid root rot. If your cactus is in a pot it should be one where excess water will drain easily. Watering should be adjusted based on the temperature and season. During the hotter parts of the year you’ll want to water about 1 time per week indoors. During the cooler months of the year you’ll want to back that off and only water when the soil is dried out completely. For outdoors you’ll need to monitor the soil and water when it’s bone dry and there’s no rain in the forecast. Learn how to water a cactus here.

RINSE OFF DIRT & DUST

When the flesh of the cactus is covered with dirt or dust it cannot process the light properly. You can use a soft sponge or rag to rinse off this residue. You can wipe it down with a sponge soaked in water and a drop of dish soap or you may choose to rinse off your cactus under the faucet in the sink. For outdoors you can use a house to gently rinse off your cactus.

CONTROL PESTS & INSECTS

Another cactus killer is pests and insects. They’ll cause yellowing sections on your cactus and make it sick. To common insects that are harmful to cacti are the spider mites and mealybugs. You can purchase solutions from your local nursery for spider mites and use rubbing alcohol to kill mealybugs. Spider mites are tiny red spiders that have webs that are like sheets. Mealybugs appear in powdery white clusters.

USE LOW NITROGEN FERTILIZER

Use some fertilizer at the beginning of the growing season which usually starts around March. Fertilizer is mixed and packaged in different ratios. The ratio that is best for cacti is one where the nitrogen is rated at 10. This means a common solution is a 10 (N) – 30 (P) – 20 (K). Avoid excessive nitrogen as it will cause stunted growth and a texture that’s flabby.

HOW TO TREAT CACTUS ROT

Cactus rot is caused by overwatering. While owners might feel like frequent tending is how you care for plants, the cactus doesn’t need as much attention. Most cactus that turn brown and black to eventually die have been overwatered by accident by their owners.

LET THEM GET DRY

While most plants get sickly if they aren’t watered often the cactus is a plant that needs to dry out as part of it’s plant cycle. The roots of the cactus are accustomed to having very little water in nature and will rot if you water them as much as you do your tomatoes.

WATCH FOR MUSHY SECTIONS & DISCOLORATION

It’s incredibly important to watch for your cactus to get mushy or start turning brown and or black. These are signs that overwatering has occurred. The roots are probably already dead and rotting. Simply do not ever overwater. Pay attention to your cactus soil and only water when it’s completely dried out. It may seem neglectful, but that’s the natural environment the cactus is used to.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU’VE FOUND CACTUS ROT

It is time to trim them off with a sharp knife and repot or replant your cactus. Make sure you use a good mixture of garden soil (2 parts), coarse sand (2 parts) and peat soil (1 part). It’s also important to choose a pot that’s a little oversized and has good drainage holes. If you’re growing cactus outside make sure the soil you’re planting in is good draining soil with a portion of sand to help facilitate this affect.

CACTUS CARE & CACTUS REMOVAL IN PHOENIX

If you’ve got cactus on your property that need to be cared for or if you need cactus removal, our team can help! We proudly care for trees and cactus in the Phoenix Valley including Chandler, Mesa, Gilbert, Scottsdale and Paradise Valley. We trim, prune, improve nutrients in soil, and remove cactus that have died. If you’d like to know more about our services, please contact us today, Call 480-962-0701 or Contact Us Today!

why-is-my-cactus-drooping
Written by webtechs

Why Is My Cactus Drooping | Causes

WHY IS MY CACTUS DROOPING | CAUSES

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When it comes to caring for cacti, there are four factors that impact their survival: water, light, pests, and temperature. Too much or too little of water, too dim or too much bright light, pests (mealybugs) or fluctuating temperatures (and usually a combination of all four) will make your cactus strained and begins to behave oddly. Cacti are hardy succulent plants that need very little water or maintenance to thrive, but they do still require some type of care. Sagging or Drooping branches suggests that your cactus plant is stressed in sort of way. Inadequate sunlight or water, mealybugs or types of freeze damage can put a strain on your cactus and can lead to a sagging or drooping appearance.

WATERING IMPROPERLY

Understanding how much water to give a cactus plant can be complicated. A dehydrated cactus will usually turn a shade of purple and can become soft. Later it can show a wrinkled appearance and the branches can droop. Over-watered cacti can also become soft and droop and they typically can develop root rot. Planting cactus in potting soil guarantees your cactus has the right type of drainage and watering more often can help to solve the dehydration issues. Repotting root-bound plants into a larger pot will also help. If your cactus has been over-watered, let the soil dry out. Cactus plants only need water when the top two inches of soil have dried out and requires only enough water to allow some drainage through holes the base of the pot. When the water begins to drain from the holes, the cactus has adequate moisture.

INADEQUATE LIGHT

Cactus plants like a lot of heat and bright light. If your cactus is starting to droop but has the proper amount of water and there are no pests visible, it may not be getting enough sunlight. If the drooping occurs during winter months, and when days are not as long, your cactus plant might need an artificial addition to the natural light it gets. During the spring, summer and fall months, when cacti require much more warmth and sunlight, cacti in pots will do well outdoors.

MEALYBUGS/ WOODLICE

Mealybugs or woodlice are white with a cotton-like appearance. These pests draw the juice from your cactus plant, leaving tiny blemishes and start to spread disease. Substantial feeding by mealybugs usually causes a loss of liveliness leading to drooping branches. There is good news, mealybugs on singular plantings can be easily killed by hand. Another alternative is rinsing the cactus with a mixture of liquid dish soap and water or an insecticidal soap and then allowing the cactus to stabilize for a day before rinsing off the soap from the cactus with water. Direct sunlight should be avoided during this time to prevent from sun burning the plant. This may take a couple of attempts since repeated applications are required to remove any hatched mealy bugs. The removal of flourishing growth, that mealy bugs love, may also help decrease their numbers.

FREEZE DAMAGE

A lot of cactus plants are indigenous to most frost-free environments, if the temperature drops below freezing for even a couple hours, freeze damage may happen. Typically, this will show as blackening of the parts of the cactus that were exposed. In a couple of weeks, the black areas dry out and the cactus branches may start to droop. If the cold temperatures only happened for a short period, then the damage is likely superficial and your cactus will likely grow out of it, but this could take a couple of years. Water, adequate sunlight and warmth will help. Cacti also are required to avoid colder drafts. If they are grown outdoors, they will thrive in a location that gets radiant heat during nighttime, like from a wall or patio. When temperatures drop, cactus grown in a garden are covered with a sheet for added warmth and cactus in pots should be relocated indoors.

CACTUS CARE & REMOVAL SERVICES PHOENIX

Phoenix Trim-A-Tree offers cactus removal services in Phoenix, Arizona. For cactus care advice in Scottsdale, Mesa, Tempe or Chandler, contact us today!

why-is-my-cactus-drooping
Written by webtechs

Cactus And Succulent Care

CACTUS AND SUCCULENT CARE

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Cactus and succulent care is a specialized area but it is something anyone can master and enjoy. Read on to learn more.

Cacti and succulents are very common houseplant nowadays. They come in a wide range of shapes and sizes from the petite to the grandiose. Cacti and succulents fall into the same category because they both have characteristics meaning they can grow in dryer environments.

Cactus and Succulents are low maintenance, water-smart plants that reserve water in their leaves and stems, creating a full or succulent aspect. They are usually found in hot, dry climates like the desert and have acclimated to tolerate long periods without water. There are a lot of varieties of succulents and cacti that grow from all over the world. For the best growing results each plant has distinct needs, but there are common rules for succulent and cactus care.

WATER – If the container your cactus is in has drainage holes, water completely at least once a week during its active growth period. If your container doesn’t have drainage holes, water moderately to moisten the soil, make sure water doesn’t pool up at the bottom of the container which can cause your cactus to rot. Allow the soil to dry between waterings.

LIGHT – Place your cactus in a south-facing window that is brightly lit indoors or in an area with bright, indirect sunlight outdoors. Some cactus can tolerate full sun but must be steadily adapted to hinder sunburn. If the light source is insufficient, etiolation will happen, and your cactus will start to become leggy as it extends outward towards a light source.

SOIL – Succulents and cacti grow best in soil that is fast draining and well aerated. Perlite or pumice mixed with soil works well for this, or you can pick up a cactus/ succulent mix.

CACTUS & SUCCULENT GROWING TIPS

LITHOP CARE (LIVING ROCK) – Take particular care not to overwater lithops, as they will rot. Water lithops during fall (when you see flower buds start to appear) and spring (after leaf shedding has happened) thoroughly (until water runs through your containers drainage holes) and let the soil dry between waterings. Abstain from watering at all during winter and summer months, except for very sparse sprinklings at least once a month. Keep your lithop in a brightly lit, south-facing window. For more information visit lithops.info

NUTRITION – Fertilize throughout the growing season with a 10-10-10 fertilizer diluted to 1/4 strength for each watering.

COLORS – Typically greener succulents are more accepting of low light environments. If your space doesn’t have a plentiful light source, try and avoid succulents that have blue, purple, pink and white tones.

PROPAGATING – Cactus has a lot of methods for reproducing and can propagate from cuttings, leaf cuttings and producing seeds.

ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING – Succulents do their best in natural light, but if this not attainable (during winter months or your geographical location), you can still give them a light source via artificial grow lights. There are a lot of options for energy-efficient artificial lighting readily available.

CACTUS RE-POTTING

If your cacti or succulent is in a container, it’s best to re-pot is in the spring. To re-pot your cacti:

  • Firstly water the cactus and allow it to drain before removing it carefully from the pot, using a folded piece of paper to protect your hands against its spikes.
  • Clear away the old soil from the roots using a thin stick, like a chopstick, so that you don’t damage the roots.
  • Put a layer of potting mix in the new pot, which should be slightly bigger in diameter, and sit the cactus on it.
  • Fill the rest of the pot with the potting mix and firm it down.
  • Don’t water for a couple of days to prevent the rotting of damaged roots.

CACTUS CARE & REMOVAL SERVICES PHOENIX

Phoenix Trim-A-Tree offers cactus removal services in Phoenix, Arizona. For cactus care advice in Scottsdale, Mesa, Tempe or Chandler, contact us today!

Palm Trees
Written by webtechs

Palm Tree Growth

PALM TREE GROWTH

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There’s a lot of residents in Phoenix Valley interested in knowing just how quickly palm trees grow in Arizona. The first factor in calculating the rate at which your palm tree will grow depends on the specific species of your palm tree. While several different palm trees can grow as much as 2 to 3-feet per year, others can take several years to reach their peak of only five feet. The best way to go about planning your landscape is to pay attention to the species you are planting, read up on that species to find out just how much they are going to grow, and also, how fast.

PALM GROWTH RATES

You will be able to look forward to having healthy growing palm trees once the watering, fertilizing, location, and pruning have all been worked out. Each species of palm trees has their own rate of growth. Continue reading below to get a better idea on what the average rate of growth for palm trees are.

FOXTAIL PALMS

As a fast-growing palm tree, the Foxtail Palm will grow 2 to 3-feet per year under normal (ideal) conditions, and reach a height of 30-feet in total height within a 10-year period. A good option for those seeking a rapid growing palm tree for shading. It has a deep root stem feature that gives it the ability to withstand drought conditions.

MEDITERRANEAN PALM

These are also known as European Fan Palm trees and they are slow growers, growing around 6-inches per year, and reaching full maturity of 20-feet in height at a very slow pace. They are however, popular due to their fronds beauty and also their bark. These palms make a nice addition to many residential landscapes for they will not overpower the landscapes visual presentation of the landscape itself or of the home.

MEXICAN FAN PALM

The Mexican Fan Palm tree grows faster than most of the other palm trees. It is also one of Arizona’s more common palm trees, which can get as high as 70 to 100-feet in height, being taller than most of the residential yards can handle. Under normal conditions the Mexican Fan Palm tree will grow as much as 4-feet per year. However, because of their rapid growth and drastic heights they are popular for use in public parks and for commercial uses.

KING PALM

The King Palm is also a rapidly growing palm. They will grow rapidly in soil with good moisture and lots of nutrition. The King Palm will grow at a rate of almost 2-feet per year. Which means that it grows a little bit slower than a Queen Palm. The growing rate for a King Palm can be increased by planting it where it only gets a small amount of shade for the sun will help it to grow faster.

QUEEN PALM

When planted within the USDA hardiness zones 9 – 11, will grow at the rate of about 2-feet per year. Thus, a 15-gal. Queen Palm plant will give you a 25-foot Queen Palm in approximately 10-years. In all, you can consider this to be a fairly high speed of growth.

TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL SERVICES PHOENIX

Phoenix Trim-A-Tree offers tree removal and trimming services in Phoenix, Arizona as well as Scottsdale, Mesa, Tempe or Chandler, contact us today!

Splitting-Firewood
Written by webtechs

Splitting Firewood

SPLITTING FIREWOOD

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Cut your own wood, it will warm you twice…or so the old saying goes. Read on to learn how you can benefit from this!

WHAT IS NEEDED

A maul or axe. A maul is heaver and has a wider head than an axe which makes it advantageous to splitting wood. But an axe can work just as well for smaller wood splitting jobs. Also, remember that the key isn’t sharpness; you’re not cutting wood or even chopping it (a common misnomer); you’re splitting wood. Seasoned wood splits better, but I usually split the wood green, so I don’t have to stack it again.

If the wood has nails in it, forget it. It’s not worth the risk of damaging your ax, or for that matter your eye when that nail goes flying. And if it’s curvy, don’t bother. I’m no safety expert, but trying to deal with unusual situations is often how accidents happen.

If it’s got a knot in it, skip it, especially if it’s green. You’ll spend all day trying to get through it. The exception is if you can find a line through the center that doesn’t get close to any knot. Then the knots won’t interfere. (“Center” is defined by the grain or splits in the wood, as shown on the right.)

SPLIT IT ALONG THE LINES

Put the piece on its end, on a chopping block if possible. If not, just put it on the ground, propping it as needed to keep it standing. Driving the axe into the ground dulls it, supposedly, but I’ve chopped into dirt countless times and the axe still cuts. Now place yourself such that when you swing with straight arms, the blade will hit the wood, right in the center (picture on left). Err on the side closer to you. Here’s why: if you miss on the side close to you, the blade goes into the ground. But if you miss on the far side, the ax handle hits the wood. Too much of that and you’ll be buying a new handle. (It hurts your arms too.) Making sure there’s no one and nothing you don’t want damaged anywhere nearby, to be hit by flying wood, a flying axe, or anything else . . . stand with your legs apart a little, pull the axe straight back over your head, and swing it straight forward. Build up speed and let the momentum and weight of the axe do the work– not your brute strength.I try to hit the same place every time. I never do. It doesn’t matter. Wood with a slightly ragged edge is not a problem. You will get the axe stuck in the wood and have to wrestle it out (right); that’s also not a problem. Eventually, it will split with a nice crack! Then do a few gentle hits into the crack to separate remaining strands of wood connecting the pieces of wood together. If the piece is bigger, you can still go for the center, but it might be easier to chop pieces off the sides, until you have something manageable.

The Result
Those pieces that you made too small . . . are your best accomplishment, because they’ll help you start the fire. Split wood burns more easily, especially the small pieces. And now that you have a woodpile full of fuel…you can now make a fire!

Source: https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/how-to-split-firewood/

TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL SERVICES PHOENIX

Phoenix Trim-A-Tree offers tree removal and trimming services in Phoenix, Arizona as well as Scottsdale, Mesa, Tempe or Chandler, contact us today!

Phoenix-Trim-A-Tree-1-Tree-Maintanance-Company
Written by webtechs

Are Palm Trees Native to Arizona?

ARE PALM TREES NATIVE TO ARIZONA?

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A lot of the residents in Arizona are wondering “Are Palm Trees Native To AZ?” Although there are thousands of palm trees to be seen around the Valley, most of those are not native of Arizona. The majority of palm trees are actually native of tropical climates, such as Florida, Southern California, South Carolina, and countries like Chile, Mexico, Peru, India, Australia, China, among others.

Having so many of them scattered all around Arizona, it may be hard to believe that they are not a native plant of Arizona, with the southern part of Arizona having an abundance of them. There are many of Arizona’s landmarks that incorporate palm plants, being almost as venerated as their iconic cacti. Landscapes all around the state lined up with Date Palms, Mexican Fan Palms, and Queen Palms, including places of retail and commercial properties. It is difficult for many of Arizona’s residents, as well as visitors to Arizona to believe that the majority of the palms in Arizona have been transplanted after being brought from in from tropical climate areas.

ARIZONA’S NATIVE PALM TREE

There is one palm in Arizona which grows naturally. It is the California Fan Palm, and it has been thought that it migrated from animal droppings and transplanted in Arizona, and these grow wild in the area between Yuma and Quartzite within the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge. The California Fan Palm grows wild in the area called the ‘Palm Canyon’.

PEOPLE ADORE PALM TREES

The reason the residents of Arizona adore the palms in their landscape is because it is the icon of the deserts oasis. Since water and shade are hard to come here in Arizona, the residents find the groves of palm trees helps keep them from thinking thoughts about vacationing, leisure, and having fun. The residents welcome shades that are casted by the palm trees, and shades casted by any tree for that matter as it gives them some relief from the hot sun and the desert heat.

ARCHITECTURAL ANCHORS IN LANDSCAPING

Palms give more than a promise of shade, they also make a strong element in the designing process of residential and commercial landscaping projects, as they are known for being “Architectural Plants,” and they can be made a significant part of making a visually stunning landscaping design. Often, they are used as projects in commercial retail real estate, golf courses, city parks, among others for the provisions of visual excitement.

WHERE DO PALM TREES COME FROM?

If Arizona has only one native palm tree, how did the others end up in Arizona? This would depend on the variety you have in mind, or own, or are thinking about purchasing.

THE QUEEN PALMS

Argentina and Brazil are the home of the Queen Palm, and as it features its graceful fronds it grows to be of medium height. Because of their country of origin, they are temperamental and are a little more sensitive than others to the cold winter frost, as well as to the summer heat when it becomes too intense.

THE ROYAL PALMS

The Royal Palms feature a bit of affluence and aristocracy, almost as though they knew they were “Royal.” These are native of tropical Mexico, the Caribbean, and some part of Southern Florida. One of their features is having a rich appearance and at their peak there is deep green skin, in all they have smooth features.

THE MEXICAN FAN PALMS

One of the palms that is most common in Arizona is the Mexican Fan Palm. Of course, you guessed it, these palms come from Mexico, their seed pods are brought to Arizona from Northern Mexico. The Mexican Fan Palms requires their gardener to be a daredevil, and those who trim them must be a professional in order to climb to trim them. These palms will grow-up to incredible heights.

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Saguaro Cactus Protection Laws

SAGUARO CACTUS PROTECTION LAWS

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The symbol of Arizona is the saguaro cactus. These are the tall and skinny cactuses that you may think of, when you think of the word “cactus”.

Go on the hiking trails in Arizona, and you begin to realize that they have a personality of their own. They begin to feel like familiar friends accompanying you along your hiking adventure. Native American mythology have numerous stories of how the saguaro cactus came to be and it typically involves people transforming into the saguaros. There is something magical and special about these cactuses that you can’t deny. While not endangered these cactuses only grow in the Sonoran desert, adding to the uniqueness of this cactus.

Sadly, from real estate to vandalism, humans pose the biggest threat to the saguaros. For this reason, there are laws protecting them. They are protected under the Native Plant Protection Act. If a person is caught cutting down a saguaro it is actually considered a felony criminal damage charge that can result in 25 years in prison. Any other type of vandalism, theft and attempts to transplant the cactus will also result in pricey fees and jail time. In order to legally remove and transplant one elsewhere, the land owner’s permission and a permit is required. In other areas such as any National Park Land, a saguaro cannot be removed. The saguaro cactus is more than just a symbol of the West, it’s the complete heart of the Sonoran Desert. Not to mention, the inside of a saguaro also provides shelter and the desert wildlife depends on this cactus for survival.

Source: https://hikephoenix.net/2018/08/28/laws-protecting-saguaro-cactuses/

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If you own a property in the Phoenix Valley our team of trained, licensed, and insured tree cutting professionals will cut down and remove your tree safely and affordable. Every one of our skilled technicians understands our safe tree removal and cutting protocols and work together to get the job done quickly and safely. Keeping your property in the best condition possible while removing the tree is also our top priority. We remove the tree, clean up the mess, and leave your property in great condition.

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Saving A Dying Cactus

SAVING A DYING CACTUS

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Most people who buy and tend cacti love them. When they get sick it’s upsetting as they’ve likely been around for years. Use these steps to help save a dying cactus at your home or business. Read on to learn more.

CUT ROTTING PARTS AWAY

Rotting is generally a sign of overwatering. The black or brown sections of the cactus must be cut away. Then you must decide if your soil is completely soaked and should be put in a new pot with new soil, or if you’ll be able to let it dry out and begin your new watering schedule again. If you decide to repot your cactus you should use mix one part peat, two parts garden soil, and two parts coarse sand.

ADJUST DAILY SUNLIGHT

Depending on the sunlight available your cactus may be getting too much or not enough sunlight. For cactus which are becoming more narrow or rounded more sunlight should be added. Either place the plant where it gets more hours of sunlight a day or choose to move it in the midday for best results.

ADJUST WATERING

For cacti that look wilted, are shrinking, or are wrinkled you should add water. It’s important to allow the soil to completely dry before watering, to avoid root rot. If your cactus is in a pot it should be one where excess water will drain easily.

Watering should be adjusted based on the temperature and season. During the hotter parts of the year you’ll want to water about 1 time per week indoors. During the cooler months of the year you’ll want to back that off and only water when the soil is dried out completely. For outdoors you’ll need to monitor the soil and water when it’s bone dry and there’s no rain in the forecast.

RINSE OFF DIRT & DUST

When the flesh of the cactus is covered with dirt or dust it cannot process the light properly. You can use a soft sponge or rag to rinse off this residue. You can wipe it down with a sponge soaked in water and a drop of dish soap or you may choose to rinse off your cactus under the faucet in the sink. For outdoors you can use a house to gently rinse off your cactus.

CONTROL PESTS & INSECTS

Another cactus killer is pests and insects. They’ll cause yellowing sections on your cactus and make it sick. To common insects that are harmful to cacti are the spider mites and mealybugs. You can purchase solutions from your local nursery for spider mites and use rubbing alcohol to kill mealybugs. Spider mites are tiny red spiders that have webs that are like sheets. Mealybugs appear in powdery white clusters.

USE LOW NITROGEN FERTILIZER

Use some fertilizer at the beginning of the growing season which usually starts around March. Fertilizer is mixed and packaged in different ratios. The ratio that is best for cacti is one where the nitrogen is rated at 10. This means a common solution is a 10 (N) – 30 (P) – 20 (K). Avoid excessive nitrogen as it will cause stunted growth and a texture that’s flabby.

HOW TO TREAT CACTUS ROT

Cactus rot is caused by overwatering. While owners might feel like frequent tending is how you care for plants, the cactus doesn’t need as much attention. Most cactus that turn brown and black to eventually die have been overwatered by accident by their owners.

LET THEM GET DRY

While most plants get sickly if they aren’t watered often the cactus is a plant that needs to dry out as part of it’s plant cycle. The roots of the cactus are accustomed to having very little water in nature and will rot if you water them as much as you do your tomatoes.

WATCH FOR MUSHY SECTIONS & DISCOLORATION

It’s incredibly important to watch for your cactus to get mushy or start turning brown and or black. These are signs that overwatering has occurred. The roots are probably already dead and rotting. Simply do not ever overwater. Pay attention to your cactus soil and only water when it’s completely dried out. It may seem neglectful, but that’s the natural environment the cactus is used to.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU’VE FOUND CACTUS ROT

It is time to trim them off with a sharp knife and repot or replant your cactus. Make sure you use a good mixture of garden soil (2 parts), coarse sand (2 parts) and peat soil (1 part). It’s also important to choose a pot that’s a little oversized and has good drainage holes. If you’re growing cactus outside make sure the soil you’re planting in is good draining soil with a portion of sand to help facilitate this affect.

TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL SERVICES PHOENIX

If you own a property in the Phoenix Valley our team of trained, licensed, and insured tree cutting professionals will cut down and remove your tree safely and affordable. Every one of our skilled technicians understands our safe tree removal and cutting protocols and work together to get the job done quickly and safely. Keeping your property in the best condition possible while removing the tree is also our top priority. We remove the tree, clean up the mess, and leave your property in great condition.

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